Underbelly Arts Online

Underbelly Arts Online explores the internet as a new space for artistic practice, unearthing local and regional artists from the Asia Pacific who are pushing the frontiers of digital expression.

This exhibition, presented in partnership with Adobe features five new artworks by artists from across the Asia Pacific.

View the exhibition here from 3 July and don’t forget to vote for your favourite work to go in the running for a night’s stay at a 5 star CBD hotel, two free tickets to the Festival and a dinner at Longrain to the value of $200! Winner announced on 3 August at ADOBE MAKE IT 2017.

Peter Nelson

Trench

Peter Nelson

Trench

Trench is an interactive media artwork that creates a landscape of sensation. Inside Trench, the player encounters a series of sculptural apparitions. They are busy, conducting a sort of ritual existence that melds with the landscape. Some of them walk together, whispering fragments of their own stories. Some of them guard corners of the trench, as they disassemble themselves and caress the rocky walls. In the midst of this landscape choreography, the player can decide their own mode of inhabitation. As the game escalates, the player can seek to escape from the trench, or eventually be killed by the other inhabitants. Trench is a labyrinthine no-place created with 3D sculpting, photographic displacement modelling and animation.

Watch the video preview and download it on Mac or PC to play for yourself.

Peter Nelson is a visual artist who works between painting, writing and digital media. He has been working between Australia and East Asia for the past 10 years, and has undertaken residency projects with Taipei Artist Village (Taipei), Organhaus (Chongqing), Red Gate Gallery (Beijing), Serial Space (Sydney) and the City of Sydney. He has held numerous group and solo exhibitions, including projects with HanArt TZ Gallery (Hong Kong), The National Palace Museum (Taiwan), The Sichuan Fine Art Academy Museum (Chongqing) and Hong Kong Polytechnic University (Hong Kong). He is currently undertaking a PhD with the School of Creative Media (Hong Kong), researching the historical significance of computer game landscapes.

Josh Harle

Make Yourself At Home - Institute for Provocation (Beijing)

Josh Harle

Make Yourself At Home - Institute for Provocation (Beijing)

Hu Wei, the Director of Beijing’s Institute for Provocation takes us around his workplace, moving from the co-working space strewn with papers and artefacts of projects he is working on, through to the yards outside with bikes propped up against the wall. The Institute is situated in a downtown suburban area of Beijing, and in the background you can hear cars, dogs and some light construction work.

After connecting with Hu Wei on WeChat, Josh Harle stitched together a 3D reconstruction of the Institute, using found images on Google, the photos and videos Hu Wei sent through, and his own imagination. The result is an uncanny rendering, an impressive feat of counterfeit space creation.

What are the differences between Hu Wei’s walkthrough and Josh Harle’s reconstruction? Whilst the technology and craftsmanship are impressive, how accurate is it really? What is added in and what is left out, and how does this change our experience of place? Make Yourself At Home explores the ways in which we use image capture technologies such as this to understand our surroundings. Whilst digital technologies appear objective and acultural, they often present inherent errors, biases and skewed perspectives.

For an interactive experience, download Josh Harle’s rendering of Beijing’s Institute for Provocation and explore it for yourself.

Josh Harle is a researcher, educator, and media artist with a background in computer science, philosophy, and fine arts. His practice explores the use of digital technologies to map and make sense of the world, critiquing the opaquely cultural practice of digital capture and resulting representations of space that mediate our engagement with the world.

Harle has exhibited locally and internationally, including for Vienna Art Week, Organhaus, Chongqing, and Today Art Museum, Beijing, and locally for solo and group shows at Firstdraft, the International Symposium on Electronic Art, and Brisbane Powerhouse. He has written for the Journal of Artistic Research, the Runway Journal for Australian Experimental Art, and Das Superpaper and presented at the National Experimental Art Forum, Perth, Transmediale, Berlin, the National Institute of Experimental Art Conference, and UC Berkeley.

Ellen.gif

Closed Group

Ellen.gif

Closed Group

ellen.gif has captured content samples from secret Facebook groups she is part of, archiving and organising them into a new website artwork. Seapunk, vaporwave, pizzawave, memewave, simpsonwave, y2k aesthetic, glitch art and other net aesthetics are explored, celebrated and documented to challenge post-content online spaces. Click through and take a peek at the wonderful world of the Facebook’s secret group subcultures.

Ellen.gif is a cyber artist who explores internet themes including nostalgia for outdated technologies, lost data, the impending obsolescence of our current media devices and evolving modes of communication.

Yun Choi

Shining

Yun Choi

Shining

Jewels upon jewels float past, flashing and sparkling, chinking like a slot machine, powering you up like an arcade game as you scroll and click. Rubies, emeralds and sapphires – once encrusted into watches and cased in glass display units, are replicated endlessly here. They are exchanged with a hyperlink to the next page, coded with data that hints: 48 images; 34.3MB. What is valuable in an arena that allows for endless replication? What is authentic and what is fake? What’s original and what’s a replica, and does it matter if you can’t tell? Can a free Wix website house a valuable artwork? Shining explores contemporary value systems and the multiple ways we navigate and uphold value in the present time.

Born in Seoul. Yun Choi focuses on the dual temporality related to the reality of South Korea through different media. She usually expresses her voice using cliché images with distorted speed. She recently participated in group exhibitions: 2016 Seoul Focus: No Longer Object, (SeMA, Buk-Seoul Museum of Art, 2017), Shame on You (Doosan Gallery New York, 2017), A Snowflake (Kukje Gallery, 2017).

 

Debbie Ding

YU & I

Debbie Ding

YU & I

Humans have enjoyed staring at fish in tanks since the Victorians became obsessed about collecting exotic tropical fish, and keeping an aquarium became a popular and often obsessive hobby. Besides real fishes, the virtual aquarium is a popular trope for animated computer screensavers.

Fish tanks are also commonly used in Chinese Fengshui, where particular placements of fishes is thought to boost the yang energy in the house and fortune of the tenant within the flat. Part of this belief of the lucky fish stems from “fish” being pronounced as “Yu” in Chinese, which also sounds like the word for “surplus” in Chinese.

In these cases, the fengshui fish tank is usually not supposed to be covered to facilitate the flow of energy. So in 2014, whilst visiting an industrial building in Singapore which had a very superstitious owner, Debbie observed that the water from his uncovered fish tank was evaporating rapidly, causing his one lonely “fengshui fish” to languish in disturbingly low water levels. She poured all the water from her water bottle into the tank, but has been wondering about the fate of the fengshui fish ever since.

This work is an analogue for our screen-based obsessions. The aquarium is where we put life into collecting cases and stare at them compulsively. Likewise, we spend a long time recording and contemplating our lives and other people’s lives via our phones, tablets, and computers. In this browser based game, the player is provided with no instructions, but must work out how and where to direct their gaze to save the fishes.

 

Debbie Ding (Singapore) is a visual artist and technologist. Her work is occupied with technologies of production and perception. Works take the form of computer-aided investigations into the spatial and cultural histories of archaeological sites, historical events, and the urban built environment. http://dbbd.sg